Institute of Energy Research and Physical Technologies > Research groups > Atomic and Molecular Physics at Surfaces > Research > Innovative energy-efficient plasma enhanced particulate filter based on dielectric barrier discharge for diesel engines in non-road application

Innovative energy-efficient plasma enhanced particulate filter based on dielectric barrier discharge for diesel engines in non-road application

Project manager: Prof. Dr. Wolfgang Maus-Friedrichs

Funding period: 09/2017 - 08/2020
Funding agency: ZIM
Funding reference number: ZF4431901CL7

Researcher: Dipl.-Phys. Uwe Kahnert

Laboratories: 1.04 (CZM)

Innovative energy-efficient plasma enhanced particulate filter based on dielectric barrier discharge for diesel engines in non-road application

Particles in exhaust gases, mainly soot particles, strike as a problematic pollutant in compression ignition engines – especially as particulate matter, but also as visible black smoke. According to new findings, particulate matter from marine diesel engines is even more harmful to the human immune system than NOx and SO2. The German Federal Environment Agency estimates the number of annual deaths due to the direct effects of particulate matter pollution at 10,000-19,000 – in Germany only. These problems are to be addressed, inter alia, by means of limit and target values based on EU directives 1999/30/EC and 2008/50/EC, which are laid down in the 39th Federal Immission Control Ordinance (BImSchV). Apart from PM10 and PM2.5 class particulate matter, especially in exhaust gases from ship diesel engines and heavy fuel oil combustion significant quantities of particles with larger diameters also occur. Previous commercial systems for reducing emissions of soot particles are based exclusively on technologies with active and passive particle filters, which lead to system-induced fuel consumption increases.

In contrast, this project aims to remove soot particles from the exhaust gas streams of engines by means of a cold plasma generated by a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD). It ensures complete removal of soot particles from the gas streams by oxidation into non-hazardous carbon dioxide. The plasma-enhanced decomposition of the particles is additionally combined with a low DC voltage field, as it is known from electrostatic precipitator systems, to increase the separation behaviour of the soot particles. The innovative aspects of the process are the advantageous deposition efficiency of an electrostatic precipitator with a significantly reduced energy requirement, which is achieved by plasma-assisted ionization and the fast and energy-efficient, plasma-enhanced decomposition of the particles into gaseous components.

In the course of the development of a marketable product, corresponding plant components will be designed, tested and adapted in the project and implemented by the industrial partners in cooperation with Clausthal University of Technology. Based on the project results, transferability to other technology fields and further applications is conceivable, e. g. in the field of soot reduction from chimneys of both large combustion plants and small fireplaces in private households, with a high market potential overall.

 

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